Somebody Has to Save The Dogs in Webster County
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Somebody Has to Save The Dogs in Webster County

“Why do you do this?” I asked Rose, the founder/director/doer-of-pretty-much-everything at Saving Webster Dogs. Rose shrugged, smiled, sighed, and said, “Somebody has to do it.” But, somebody doesn’t have to do it. In fact, nobody else in Webster County, West Virginia is willing to do what Rose does to save these dogs.

Rescue Dependent on One Individual
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Rescue Dependent on One Individual

This is not a sustainable situation, but it is one that we encounter almost everywhere we go: Incredible heroes (mostly middle-aged and older women) sacrificing everything to save the animals, and counties who count on them with no plan for what happens when they can no longer continue to rescue (or the rescue connections dry up).

I asked Leonika how we solve this, and she shook her head. She said


@OPENARMSAnimalShelter
@Lawrencecountyhumanesociety-LouisaKY

Together We Can Let the Dogs Out
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Together We Can Let the Dogs Out

After nearly two weeks in Georgia and Florida (with one quick stop in NC), we are home and I’m sifting through all that we learned. The chorus of too many dogs and not enough adopters, resources, or rescues were variations on the same theme. Just like other trips, we met heroic rescue coordinators, shelter directors,…

Now You Can See It Too
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Now You Can See It Too

The smell is familiar to me now, but that hot August day in 2018 it overwhelmed my senses. The mix of disinfectant, urine, feces, mildew, and desperation was powerful, made even more so by the heat. Shelters, even the good ones, I’ve come to understand, have the same smell. I recognized it that first time…